Private and public investment in Canada 2011


Les investissements dans la construction d'immobilisations ainsi que dans le matériel et l'outillage devraient augmenter de 3,3 % en 2011 pour atteindre 349,1 milliards de dollars.

La plus grande partie de la reprise des investissements subséquente au ralentissement économique de 2009 s'est produite en 2010, en raison d'une forte croissance des investissements tant publics (+17,5 %) que privés (+8,0 %). Si les perspectives se concrétisent, les augmentations de 2011 seront principalement attribuables à des investissements privés, qui devraient croître de 3,8 % pour atteindre 261,3 milliards de dollars.

Des dépenses d'investissement privé importantes sont prévues pour le secteur de l'extraction minière et de l'extraction de pétrole et de gaz, dont la croissance devrait atteindre 11,4 % pour s'établir à 53,0 milliards de dollars


2011

Investment in capital construction and machinery and equipment is expected to rise 3.3% in 2011 to $349.1 billion.

Much of the recovery from the 2009 economic downturn occurred in 2010 due to strong growth on the part of both public (+17.5%) (attention, ici on le fait par endettement) and private (+8.0%) investment.

If intentions are realized, increases in 2011 will be led by private investment, which is expected to grow 3.8% to $261.3 billion.

Significant private capital spending intentions are anticipated from the mining and oil and gas extraction sector, which is expected to grow 11.4% to $53.0 billion.

Note to readers

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Housing starts are forecast under high, medium and low scenarios by Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. These scenarios are used to estimate new housing investment, a key component of the overall housing forecast estimates.

The 2011 estimates for housing in this release are based on the the mid-case scenario for each province. The table "Capital spending in Canada, 2011 intentions, by scenario", which appears at the end of this release, covers all three scenarios.

Investment intentions for non-residential construction and machinery and equipment are based upon a sample survey of 28,000 private and public organizations. This survey was conducted between October 2010 and late January 2011.

Data in this release are expressed in current dollars.

By investment component, construction is expected to increase 3.6% to $240.6 billion and will account for more than two-thirds of total capital spending.

Canada's housing sector is forecast to increase to $94.7 billion in 2011, up 1.5%, following 15.5% growth in 2010.

Mining and oil and gas extraction sector fuels investment

Investment intentions by companies in the oil and gas extraction sector will reach an estimated $35.7 billion in 2011, up $3.0 billion (+9.1%) from 2010.

Powered by a host of new projects in the Alberta oil sands, investment in non-conventional oil extraction is expected to rise 27.8% in 2011 to $14.3 billion.

Investment in the mining sector is expected to total $11.5 billion in 2011, up 23.8%. This is the second year of strong growth in this sector, following a 31.8% increase in 2010. Much of the additional capital spending is earmarked for the development of several metal ore mining projects.

Investment in support activities for mining and oil and gas extraction is expected to rise 3.9% in 2011 to $5.7 billion.

Primary metal manufacturing set to increase

Overall, the manufacturing sector intends to invest 15.1% more on capital construction and machinery and equipment in 2011, reaching a total of $17.1 billion. This growth is expected mainly to be due to strong gains in the primary metal manufacturing industry (+67.7%), which will account for more than half of the entire sector's expected increase. Investment intentions for most of the remaining industries in this sector are expected to increase modestly from 2010.

Canada's transportation and warehousing sector is expected to rise 14.4% to $22.1 billion in 2011. Most of this increase can be attributed to an increase of over $1.5 billion (+28.0%) in the transit and ground passenger transportation industry.

Investment by public administration expected to remain stable

Following a 19.3% increase in 2010, investment spending by the public administration sector is expected to total $42.8 billion, down 0.2%.

Only provincial governments are expecting to increase their capital spending in 2011. Provincial government capital outlays are expected to reach a total of $17.5 billion, up 2.5%. Spending by the federal government is expected to fall by 7.2%, while municipal capital spending is expected to decrease slightly by 0.4%.

Investment increases in most regions

Although increases in investment intentions are widespread across Canada, both Alberta and Quebec show considerable strength.

Capital outlays in Alberta are expected to increase 4.3% to $73.5 billion, primarily due to higher investment intentions in oil and gas extraction.

In Quebec, higher investment intentions in the manufacturing, utilities, mining and oil and gas extraction sectors are behind an anticipated increase of 3.8% to $66.6 billion.

Source : Private and public investment, Statistique Canada


Capital spending of private and public organizations, non residential construction and machinery and equipment, provinces and territories

 

2009 actual

2010 preliminary actual

2011 intentions

Actual 2009 to preliminary actual 2010

Preliminary actual 2010 to intentions 2011

 

$ millions

% change

Canada

225,806.4

244,735.2

254,405.9

8.4

4.0

Non-residential construction

124,572.1

138,787.7

145,867.8

11.4

5.1

Machinery and equipment

101,234.3

105,947.5

108,538.1

4.7

2.4

Newfoundland and Labrador

3,516.9

4,820.0

6,604.9

37.1

37.0

Non-residential construction

2,399.5

3,395.9

4,440.4

41.5

30.8

Machinery and equipment

1,117.4

1,424.1

2,164.6

27.4

52.0

Prince Edward Island

639.7

651.9

641.3

1.9

-1.6

Non-residential construction

328.9

361.3

355.9

9.9

-1.5

Machinery and equipment

310.8

290.6

285.4

-6.5

-1.8

Nova Scotia

4,600.7

4,541.7

4,527.2

-1.3

-0.3

Non-residential construction

2,648.1

2,585.5

2,497.9

-2.4

-3.4

Machinery and equipment

1,952.5

1,956.2

2,029.3

0.2

3.7

New Brunswick

4,344.7

4,114.3

3,944.1

-5.3

-4.1

Non-residential construction

2,403.3

2,256.9

1,985.7

-6.1

-12.0

Machinery and equipment

1,941.3

1,857.4

1,958.4

-4.3

5.4

Quebec

39,504.1

41,494.9

44,247.1

5.0

6.6

Non-residential construction

20,899.1

22,833.3

24,485.5

9.3

7.2

Machinery and equipment

18,605.1

18,661.6

19,761.6

0.3

5.9

Ontario

68,489.7

75,769.1

77,026.6

10.6

1.7

Non-residential construction

30,176.4

34,700.8

36,238.3

15.0

4.4

Machinery and equipment

38,313.3

41,068.3

40,788.3

7.2

-0.7

Manitoba

7,448.2

8,285.5

8,273.6

11.2

-0.1

Non-residential construction

4,472.7

5,142.7

4,913.6

15.0

-4.5

Machinery and equipment

2,975.5

3,142.8

3,360.0

5.6

6.9

Saskatchewan

12,790.4

13,771.2

14,731.8

7.7

7.0

Non-residential construction

8,653.2

9,177.5

9,389.4

6.1

2.3

Machinery and equipment

4,137.3

4,593.7

5,342.4

11.0

16.3

Alberta

55,293.6

57,437.9

60,064.2

3.9

4.6

Non-residential construction

34,305.7

35,603.9

39,129.6

3.8

9.9

Machinery and equipment

20,987.8

21,833.9

20,934.7

4.0

-4.1

British Columbia

27,074.7

31,112.9

31,138.2

14.9

0.1

Non-residential construction

16,638.8

20,572.9

19,841.6

23.6

-3.6

Machinery and equipment

10,435.9

10,539.9

11,296.6

1.0

7.2

Yukon

467.7

715.4

796.1

53.0

11.3

Non-residential construction

343.8

501.5

555.9

45.9

10.8

Machinery and equipment

123.9

213.8

240.3

72.5

12.4

Northwest Territories

1,000.8

1,330.8

1,083.3

33.0

-18.6

Non-residential construction

780.4

1,074.5

829.6

37.7

-22.8

Machinery and equipment

220.4

256.2

253.8

16.3

-1.0

Nunavut

635.2

689.6

1,327.2

8.6

92.5

Non-residential construction

522.2

580.8

1,204.4

11.2

107.4

Machinery and equipment

113.0

108.9

122.8

-3.6

12.8

Note(s):

Data may not add up to totals as a result of rounding.