The top 10 entrepreneurial cities in Canada

Si vous avez l’âme de devenir futur entrepreneur, vous savez ou aller.


Extrait de: The top 10 entrepreneurial cities in Canada, Globe and Mail, Monday, Mar. 28, 2011

With small and medium entreprises (SMEs) employing 53 per cent of the country's working population, it's clear that SMEs, whether located in urban or rural areas, play a critical role in Canada's economic growth and social well-being. The following list, compiled from research conducted by the Canadian Federation of Independent Businesses (CFIB), represents the top 10 entrepreneurial cities in Canada.

"There is no single best way to measure the entrepreneurship quotient of cities," according to the report, so the CFIB uses a range of approaches to arrive at an overall score out of 100. Some of these indicators include the presence of a high concentration of entrepreneurs, high business start-up rate, high levels of optimism and success in their operations and good public policy.


Communities in Boom: Canada's top entrepreneurial cities in 2010

Ted Mallett, Vice-President & Chief Economist

Queenie Wong, Research Analyst

City Entrepreneurial Index -1

Entrepreneurship matters, particularly at the local level. Looking at a wide range of indicators on the presence, growth, health and policy environment for small business ownership and entrepreneurship, Western Canadian cities dominate the list for 2010. Alberta metropolitan areas occupy five of the top 10, including top ranking Grande Prairie. Lloydminster, on the Alberta-Saskatchewan border is close behind, followed by two more Saskatchewan communities, Saskatoon and Prince Albert.

Scores are slightly higher than last year, mainly because the economy is further in recovery. However, only two out of 100 cities in the list score higher than 70 out of 100-which shows there is room for considerable improvement even for cities near the top of the list. Typically small and mid-size cities outpoint larger urban cores.

What makes an entrepreneurial city:

There is no question that small and medium enterprises (SMEs) are Canada's engine of growth. After all, SMEs employ about 53% of all working individuals in the country. Businesses, whether they are located in urban or rural areas, play an integral part in the economic and social well-being of communities. In this study, Canadians can gain a better understanding of the triumphs and hardships of small business ventures.

There is no single best way to measure the entrepreneurship quotient of cities, so CFIB combines a range of approaches to arrive at an overall score. It may seem obvious, but the surest signs of an entrepreneurial hot spot are the presence of a high concentration of entrepreneurs and a high business start-up rate. It is also important that business owners have high levels of optimism and success in their operations. Good public policy is also critical, so we look at the presence of supportive local government tax and regulatory policies.